Resources for adults

About Us

The Basics

Teens

Adults

Resource Hub

Events

Contact

About Us

The Basics

Teens

Adults

Resource Hub

Events

Contact

“My hope is that in fifty years we’ll have a generation that has grown up their whole lives hearing about consent and boundaries.” — Tarana Burke, Activist and Founder of the #MeToo movement

Parents and guardians

Men as allies

Coaches

School Teachers

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.” — Frederick Douglass, American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman

School Teachers

Teachers play a vital role in their students’ academic and emotional and social development. For some kids, teachers are their closest allies and safest adults. This type of influence provides a tremendous opportunity for building student self-esteem and to model with them, healthy communication, boundaries, and respect. In other words, school teacher’s can play a vital role in sexual violence prevention. Please see below for resources on ways to engage your students in sexual violence prevention activities.

“Sexual harassment and assault occur in all kinds of schools, regardless of location. Remember that students have come to endure sexual harassment as a normal part of their school experience, even though it interferes with their learning and takes an emotional toll. Most parents aren’t aware of the risks that all children face.” — Ending K-12 Sexual Harassment: A Toolkit for Parents and Allies/Stop Sexual Assault in Schools

Community Educators and Leaders

“Children are likely to live up to what you believe of them.” — Lady Bird Johnson. American socialite and the First Lady of the United States as the wife of the 36th President of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson

Community Educators and Leaders

After school staff, youth group leaders, camp counselors, LGBTQ Center staff, community educators, and the like, provide safe spaces and growth opportunities for youth. These community members often connect with youth in a more personal and relaxed way than teachers and parents/guardians; almost like a peer rather than authority figure. Such relationships can create opportunities for teens to be more open and vulnerable to both learning and sharing. As such, these community leaders have a key role in engaging kids in discussions and activities that can lead to decreased sexual and dating violence. Please see resources below.
en_USEnglish